Monthly Book Recommendation: NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity


This month, I am recommending the book:

NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity by Steve Silberman

If you are interested in a deeper understanding of the history of autism, this is a great and in-depth book to read.

The book definitely has some heft, and took me awhile to get through. In the afterward, Silberman shares that it took him five years to research the history of autism.

His main emphasis is a positive one: the world thrives with neurodiversity. He also advocates for people on the spectrum to have a larger role in advocating for themselves, and for a greater push in services. 

Note: The book is not without some controversy. My simplified read on his take regarding some controversial issues is: overall, autism has not increased dramatically, rather, now we have an increase due to society identifying autism and widening of the spectrum, and that vaccines have no bearing on the increase. Even if you disagree with some of his viewpoints (I felt his section on pollutants skimmed the surface), it is still a very worthwhile and great read! 

Monthly Book Recommendation: Carly’s Voice

Monthly Book Recommendation:

Carly’s Voice: Breaking Through Autism

Written by: Arthur Fleischmann with Carly Fleischmann

I could not more highly recommend a book. This is a true story about a girl (now woman) named Carly who is on the autism spectrum and is nonverbal. I see this book as two separate stories:

  • the parents’ story (including Carly’s teachers)
  • Carly’s story

I am particularly drawn to books about autism that are told from the perspective of family members, and especially from the person with autism her/himself.

Carly learns to type at the age of ten, and is finally able to express her needs/wants–and witty personality (not a spoiler–it’s on the back cover of the book). One is able to read a first-hand account explaining many of the behaviors Carly exhibits and how it feels to be Carly with autism. It is significant, because this is all from a person who was presumed to have low intellectual functioning.

If you read this book, you will grow in both compassion and understanding. It is excellent.