Data Tracking and Student Growth, Part I

As a Learning Specialist, I report progress on IEP goals in quantitative terms. As such, it’s essential (for my sanity) to have a good system in place for recording and retrieving student data.

Setting up a system is initially time consuming, but once in place, it saves you time and allows you to be accurate and confident in your reporting throughout the year. It is also a great way for you to identify areas of need and growth for your students.

Here are some key points to consider/follow when recording major data points:

  • Identify what you want to measure.
  • Identify what assessments you will use to measure student growth.
  • Give assessment and establish a baseline for each student.
  • Identify how often you will access; this is typically fall, winter, and spring.

When thinking about data collection, mull over these points and ask, “What do I want to measure?” For me, this typically includes: decoding, fluency, comprehension, writing, and mathematical computations.

In Part II, I will give you specific examples of what assessments I use, and how I record them.

Happy teaching!

Summer Break!

Because readership goes way down in summer, and because teachers need a break, I will be taking a break from blogging this summer. 

I look forward to being back come August, with lots of great fresh teaching material.

Enjoy your summer!

Happy Holidays!

 

Happy Holidays! 

The students are full of excitement, and I am hearing lots of cute talk about Santa. I hope you all have a Merry Christmas and wonderful break.

“I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.” –Charles Dickens

An Amazing Pencil Sharpener!

IMG_1659We have a new colleague on our personalized learning team, and she introduced us to an amazing pencil sharpener.

Can you really get excited about a great pencil sharpener? Well, if you’re a teacher, the answer is a definitive “yes.”

My students call it the “old fashioned” pencil sharpener because it is not electric. That is part of the appeal for me–no high pitch grinding noise. Also, it will not eat your pencils. It grips the pencil and sharpens it to a sharp point, and no more. This is not a paid endorsement 🙂

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Like coloring books, there is something therapeutic about sharpening a bunch of pencils all at once.

The brand is: CARL ANGEL-5 Pencil Sharpener. “The Original Quality.”

Summer Break!

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Time for some rest and relaxation. I will only be posting occasionally over the summer. I hope you all have a wonderful summer.

“Keep your face to the sun and you will never see the shadows.” –Helen Keller

 

The Six Syllable Types

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These are six syllable types that make up the majority of words in English.

They are:

1. Closed Syllables
2. Open Syllables
3. Vowel-Consonant-e Syllable
4. Consonant-le Syllable
5. R-Controlled Syllables
6. Vowel Teams

What are the benefits in learning these six types?

English is a very complicated language, and teaching the syllabication principles will help your child/student chunk words down into more manageable parts. This, in turn, will help with overall reading skills and identify of spelling patterns.

This will also be especially beneficial for students who have a specific learning disability in reading. Research supports that teaching phonics is the most effective type of reading instruction for students with dyslexia.

In the upcoming weeks, I will tackle the different syllable types. Whether a refresher, or new material, I hope this series helps!

Happy Holidays!

emma

Here is a picture of my sweet girl. This is my favorite fundraiser, pictures with Santa–proceeds help support an organization that rescues weimaranars.

I hope you are having a wonderful holiday break!